Food Time

RAW MEATY BONES are excellent for dogs

COOKED MASHED PUMPKIN, fresh or canned is a miracle worker for diarrhea or constipation provided there is no bacterial or viral infection causing the problem.  It’s good to try first before rushing off to the vet.

Yougart is a soother for a dodgy tummy.  Inflammation is an often silent pre-cursor to disease. Prevention is so much better than treatment!

COLD PRESSED Flax Seed Oil is fabulous for skin and coat, and is a natural anti‐inflammatory.  It contains the essential Omega 3 Fatty Acids that most other oils do not have.  One Tablespoon for a large adult dog, or a teasponful for a little dog or puppy, given two or three times a week provide essential Omegas and boost the immune system.  It isn’t necessary to give it every day to a healthy dog.

Did you know that one hard- boiled egg each day is a natural anti-inflammatory for you and for your dog?

Feeding Fresh is so Easy!

Fresh raw meaty rib bones, Fresh raw calf liver, Lamb hearts and brains

Fresh raw chicken backs/frames/thighs/necks,

Cheese,

Plain yogurt NOT flavoured and not sweetened

Chop or minced raw fresh beef or lamb. DO NOT CUT OFF THE FAT. DOGS AND PUPPIES NEED THE FAT IN AND AROUND THE MEAT.

Sardines (the tinned variety packed in OIL)

Green leafy vegetables and carrots mixed in a blender and stirred through chopped meat OR Vegetable juice a little poured over the meat feed

Eggs: raw, scrambled or boiled

Once or twice each week as you’re preparing the vegetables and leafy greens for the family, you could put some aside into the blender.

Add water or stock and blend until it’s a sloppy mixture then mix it through some chopped or minced beef or lamb from the butcher. A stock cube will add some flavour if your dog doesn’t immediately love it, but I think you’ll find that he will.  A raw egg, shell and all can also be added into the blender.  If you’re feeding a puppy under six months old, it is better to omit the shell.

This meal mimics Nature just like the stomach contents of the wild dog’s prey.  For treats, instead of using those highly processed dyed, preserved, coloured (and expensive) items, try using  LITTLE PIECES OF CHEESE.

COOKING VEGETABLES

You could put the raw chopping scraps into your blender, add a little water or stock and blend to a sloppy consistency then mix it through your dog’s minced or chopped meat. EASY!

This is a handy meal in which to add herbs such as milk thistle  (don’t give to pregnant females)  and nettle.  Both are great blood purifiers and tonic for liver and kidneys.

BOILING OR SCRAMBLING EGGS  FOR THE FAMILY?  Just pop an extra one in for your dog.  Easy!

GOT SOME TOAST LEFT OVER FROM BREAKFAST?  Give it to your dog!  Easy!

(they love peanut butter and it’s good for them too)

BUY SOME CHEESE CUBED IT AND USE IT FOR TREATS.  Easy!  Dogs love cheese and it’s good for them too!

We all probably know someone who says they have fed cooked bones to their dog for years and nothing has happened.  This may be so, but do you really want to take the chance?

AVOID:  Pet food which has listed as ingredients, Corn, Wheat, or Grains.  Wheat and Corn and their by-products are known triggers for skin problems, hot spots and allergic reactions in dogs.

There ARE a few  ‘Do’s’ and some ‘Don’ts’

NO grapes or raisins

NO chocolate

NO Onions

NO seeds from fruit

NO nuts    –  ……………………………….. apart from Peanut which is GREAT for dogs

NO cooked bones – ever – Dogs have powerful hydrochloride digestive juices that nature designed to dissolve raw bone so that it doesn’t splinter inside the dog.  Cooking bones changes their molecular structure in such a way that the dog’s digestive system can no longer dissolve the bone.  It is then brittle and can splinter inside the dog, and cause horrendous injury even resulting in death.  You may get away with it a hundred times – but is it really worth the risk?

There are many good books on the market about the Raw Food Diet for Dogs.  Susan K Johnson is our favourite author on these.  Try ‘Switching to Raw’